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Dr. Pirkko Schuppan

Fold Woman: Gaby Roslin
March 22, 2018 The Fold

On her childhood:

I’m London born and bred. My dad [Clive Roslin] worked at the BBC and he’d take me into Television Centre when I was little. I remember walking in, holding his hand, and just loving everything about it. By the age of three, I wanted to be a presenter. It was never about being famous; I just wanted to work in television. My parents encouraged me to go for it and I’ve been in the industry for 32 years. I still pinch myself that I get paid to do what I love.

On her early career:

My father got a job as a broadcaster after studying at RADA so I figured that the best way into the industry was to go to drama college. I trained as an actress at GSA, then landed a job presenting a daily children’s show on Super Channel, the first pan-European satellite station. After that, I had a brief stint working for the Emanuel’s, the fashion designers, then spent the next three years co-hosting the ITV Saturday morning kids show Motormouth.

On her working day:

I’m out the door by 8.15am every morning for the school run, then I go to the gym and head into town for meetings. I walk everywhere – usually between 5-12 miles a day, according to my Fitbit. I have an amazing pair of sparkly trainers from Air & Grace; they are super comfortable and they look good in meetings, too. I pick the kids up between 4-5pm and cook a fresh meal for the family every night. I’m absolutely passionate about health and nutrition. My favourite part of the day is a hot bath.

I still pinch myself that I get paid to do what I love. Live TV is my drug of choice; it’s the best natural high on the planet.

On her go-to style:

I’m definitely a skinny jeans and heels girl. I love fashion but for years it was frowned upon to care about what you wore; it meant you were stupid or insipid. Actually, it’s ok to want to look good and feel good. It’s empowering. My mother never bought new clothes – she couldn’t afford them so she wore her mother’s hand-me-downs. She also felt it was wrong to buy clothes and then chuck them away. That definitely rubbed off on me. I do this thing on my Instagram called Shopping In My Wardrobe where I encourage people to open up their wardrobe and rediscover a forgotten outfit or to pair something old with something new.

On her power suit:

It would probably still be jeans! But I love wearing a frock for red carpet events. I’m very lucky that Ralph Lauren and Amanda Wakeley lend me stuff for events. I feel like Cinderella for the night, then reluctantly hand everything back the next day. I adore this Hartley tailored blue wool suit by The Fold. I don’t want to take it off.

On her style icon:

Jennifer Aniston or Cameron Diaz. They look great without looking like they’ve tried too hard. Ultimately, women should wear what they want. There’s far too much judgement out there.

Ultimately, women should wear what they want. There’s far too much judgement out there.

On her role model:

Without doubt, my grandmother [Muriel Roslin]. My grandparents lived in Zimbabwe, or Southern Rhodesia as it was then, and she started the first non-racial children’s home. By 1953, she had become the only female MP in parliament. Following Ian Smith’s Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) in 1965, she worked with the opposition to get him removed from office. She strongly believed that it should be a shared country – a non-racial state. She was amazing. My father grew up in Harare and we would go there on holiday for a few weeks every year to visit my grandparents. I still think of it as my second home.

On her big passions:

Television. Shoes. And more television.

On her toughest life challenge:

When I was 32, I lost my mother to lung cancer. And I’ve since lost many dear friends to the disease. If you’re caring for a sick person, my advice is to make sure you look after yourself too. When mum was ill, I’d wake up, visit her in hospital, then go and see my dad who was diagnosed with bowel cancer at more or less the same time. Then I’d go into work – I was having a hard time in the press at that stage – and go home via dad’s hospital and then mum’s. I stopped going to the gym. I stopped eating properly. I forgot to focus on myself and it was really tough. When I talk about that year. it’s like I’m talking about someone else. But I’m a coper. You get through those things and life goes on.

Defining career moment:

The Big Breakfast. Gosh, I wanted that job so badly. I did five screen tests for the show over four months. At the very last one, Chris [Evans] said ‘Stop auditioning her and just give her the job!’ The production company, Planet 24, invited me to a meeting and I thought they were going to ask me to do yet another screen test – but they told me I’d got the job. I was in a glass office and they said, ‘Don’t tell anyone and don’t react – this hasn’t been released to the press yet.’ So I calmly got up, walked out the building, got into the car, and screamed my head off.

On her ambition:

I love doing my BBC Radio London programme but my dream is to present a daily live TV show, similar to Ellen. That would be such a hoot. I really enjoy interviewing people because I’m so nosy. Live TV is my drug of choice; it’s the best natural high on the planet.

On her advice to other women:

Follow your dreams but don’t hurt anyone in the process. Put those sharp elbows away and be supportive of each other.

Follow your dreams but don’t hurt anyone in the process. Put those sharp elbows away and be supportive of each other.

Interview: Kate Bassett

Photography: Kate Booker Photography

Accessories: Gaby’s own

Shot at The Fold’s Chelsea store

Shop Gaby's Look

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